About your Search

20140226
20140306
STATION
ALJAZAM 42
CNNW 21
CSPAN 19
MSNBCW 13
CSPAN2 9
KQED (PBS) 8
CNBC 2
WUSA (CBS) 2
FBC 1
KGO (ABC) 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
KTVU (FOX) 1
WJLA 1
LANGUAGE
English 151
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 151 (some duplicates have been removed)
they are from self-defense forces looking to russia for protection, but not members of the russian military. those are the outlines of the developments so far today. let's just listen to a little of what sergei lavrov had to say in mid drid. >> translator: i would to understand what you understand by pro russian forces. these are the forces of self-defense created by the residents of crimea. we did not order them. they didn't get any orders from us. as to the military personnel of the black sea fleet, they are in places of their dislocation, yes. some additional measures of extra vigilance were taken to provide the security of the troops of the police fleet. as our president said we will do everything not to let any bloodshed, not to any attempt at life and security of those who live in the ukraine including, of course, the citizens of the russian federation. >> reporter: sergei lavrov speaking in madrid. let's go to tom barge who sdwroins us now from madrid. was anything discussed about this outline plan about international monitors, tom? >> reporter: it's interesting, a small protest grou
they said that this is not app invasion, it's a protective defensive measure, and on land and at sea in the harbour, what they have down is surround places. that is not to say that they want to go in and have a fight. it's to stop what they would see as fascist elements from kiev or troops here controlled by fascist elements from kiev attacking the pro-russian majority civilian population. whether you believe it, because we have seen no sign of fascist elements here at all, and no sign of the ukrainian soldiers wanting to engage in a fight as evidence of the situation at the sevastopol airport. certainly the russians want to be seen here as nonaggressive. given that they have been approached by a group of ukrainians without arms, there's no way in the world they would have wanted to be seen to be firing on unarmed ukrainian soldiers. that would be disastrous for them. >> laurence lee reporting there from crimea. >> the united states and the european union are both considering sanctions against russia. what are they likely to comprise, and how much bite will they have. one of the russ
this afternoon is dr. james jay carafano, vice president of foreign and defense policy studies. he is our richardson fell and also directs the kathryn and shelby david institute for international study. he also serves as a senior fellow at the george washington university homeland security policy institute, serves on the board of trustees for the marine corps university foundation, on the advisory board for the west point center of or history, the hambleton society and operation renewed hope foundation. is an agenda professor at georgetown university and the institute of world politics and to serve as a visiting professor at the national defense university as well as georgetown university. he has written several books, the most recent being his co-authoring of a textbook on homeland security and, of course, he co-authored for heritage, our book on winning the long war, lessons from the cold war for defending terrorism and preserving freedom. lease join me in welcoming jim carafano. [applause] >> thank you. i'm going to be extremely brief so we can get right to the top of. i want to start
. strengthen nato's defense posture and impose costs on the putin government. broadly these are objectives most americans want to achieve right now but this particular circumstance i believe presents president obama with a fairly stark choice. ad-libbing was the term kim used. i would describe it as muddling through. he can either seek to mutt dell through this crisis or use it to articulate a broader vision of the role the united states should be playing and what we should be achieving through global leadership at this time. this is important because the russian invasion ever the crimean peninsula, is in my view symptommic of a role in which we see growing pressure against our allies, security partners, our friend in many areas and many regions simultaneously. would compare this moment perhaps to, once again kim mentioned the example of president carter facing the soviet invasion of afghanistan. would compare it both to perhaps president truman in 1947 looking at turkey straits crisis which was a very specific circumstance to which there were specific measures taken in terms of u.s. military a
. it is a surprise exercise of combat readiness. agoas planned a long time with the defense ministry -- they told me about it earlier. he had all the orders ready. exercise has been finished. yesterday, i ordered the troops to return to their military bases. what could trigger a possible use of military force? it is only an extreme case. the legitimate president requested russia to use the military force to defend the lives and health of ukrainians. --major concern is the situation that is happening. so many nationalists and radical rampant on the streets of kiev. the news media was chained on a square. handcuffed to some fixture. it was freezing cold. he was holed up in a basement and tortured. how do you define that? is this democracy? is this an expression of democracy? if all authorities are corrupt -- he has not been able to rob anything. there was none there. there was just one technical guide their -- there. i am an i.t. guy. could you let a woman out? he was shot dead right there. second i.t. guy was forced into the basement. he was burned alive. what we see that, we realize what the major c
and nothing happened. so the russian defense ministry said it didn't issue such an ultimatum, but the ukrainian defense forces said that they definitely received it. and journalists did report witnessing that ultimatum being handed to them. so, it's not quite clear who exactly is threatening whom, but the situation, you know, remains such that everyone is waiting for russia to play its hand and attack or not attack. >> what -- people in the area want or thinks, not the military but the people. >> i think ethnic russian community in crimea, which is the majority of the population on the peninsula, they are content to have the russian troops here protecting them from the new government that came to power in last month's revolution. however, they do not want any blood to be spilled. i think the minute that russia attacks any of the bases or kills any ukrainian servicemen, they will lose the support of the local population definitely. >> simon, if you will stand by, we will get back to you little later in the hour. thank you, simon. >> thank you. >> what should the united states
if they were russian soldiers that are not. he said those were local self-defense units. he even denies that they are russian soldiers there when we all know that that is the height of arrogance in my view. you saw the picture of those two sitting next to each other. have you seen the attitude that putin has towards the president of the united states. he doesn't respect him. >> so what are we going to do? it doesn't look like britain is going to go with us and germany is not going to go with us and western europe is so hungry for that oil that either originates in russia or comes through it or the natural gas. >> well, we are going to tell them they should be ashamed of themselves because you are right. but, we need to first help get ukraine back on its feet financially there. they're on the brink of collapse. second, make sure that we do everything possible to get mull dove have a and georgia into nato. third of all, we maybe need to do some military exercise with our small baltic state friends. we need to restate and start working on the missile defense system and the czech republic a
the russian troops adopted what they would see entirely as defensive positions and having their photographs taken with pro-russian local and smoking cigarettes in many places and have not had clips loaded on their guns and they have been, i think, at pains to point out they don't want to be seen as an aggressive force equally. by the same token the body language and symbolism from the ukraine troops this morning was equally passive and one was a soviet flag from the second world war saying they fought against fascism but are no longer but carried a ukraine flag and the implication of that is they want to be see potentially being on the russian side but won't surrender and will not swear allegiance to the flag and there is not resistance going on but a sense of defiance as well. >> reporter: lawrence, thanks for keeping us up to date with the events in crimea and we will keep a close eye on things there. russia appears to be moving more military assets to the region and russian war ships passed through in istambul and saying they may go to ukraine and they are in ukraine by a lesser sense o
, was to enhance the defense of our military facilities because they are constantly receiving threats, and we were aware of the armed nationalists moving in. now, russia has well-trained, well-equipped, now additional 16,000 or more, and vladimir putin was worried about enhancing the defense of his military facilities because they were constantly receiving threats. there is something i'd like to stress, however, he goes on to say. obviously, what i am going to say now is not within my authority, and we do not intend to interfere. however, we firmly believe that all citizens of ukraine, i repeat, wherever they live should be given the same equal right to participate in the life of their country in determining its future. my friends, we are seeing justification for intervention and serious intervention in eastern ukraine. so he goes on to further questions, and then he goes on to take a shot at the united states, saying our partners, especially in the united states, always clearly formulate their own geopolitical and state interests and follow them with persistence, then using the principle -- quote
the threat or use of force. and that none of their weapons will ever be used against ukraine except in self-defense or otherwise in accordance with the charter of the united nations. that clearly hasn't happened now, even though putin claims he's potential acting to protect the russian populace. >> no, it hasn't, but then again, you know, seen from not just russia, but many ukrainance as well, what happened was not like what happened in egypt with the overthrow of commune im. yanukovych was a repulsive ruler in many ways, but he wasn't elected. a large part of the ukrainian parliament is being chased out of kiev, you know, the representatives of the east and south, the parties which supported yanukovych. so it is highly questionable whether this government in kiev does have any degree of democratic legitimately. that's why, quite rightly, the west has gotten a promise of new elections in may, but of course the question is how one can hold free and fair elections with nationalist militia in control of with you pant of the country and russian soldiers in control of another. >> finally, the west is cl
that russians, the ukrainian defense ministry now being denied from russia. what's the story from where you are tim? >> reporter: well i think everyone has an agenda obviously with this crisis in crimea. and of course, to a certain extent it is in the ukrainians' interest to keep reports of russian aggression or alleged aggression or forthcoming aggression high on the agenda. now, it pa may well frof to be e in the -- prove to be true in the coming hours that russia is going to carry out some kind of ultimatum or fulfill some kind of deadline for ukrainian troops have have been -- who have been surrounded in crimea by pro-russian forces, in their barracks, on their ships, may make good this reported threat which was coming from sources certified the defense ministry here, may make good that, and actually fulfill their plan. but, as you say, it's been denied at the moment by russia. now, at the moment, we can just watch and wait. and report what both sides are saying. so it is a very tense situation. and obviously, russia, as well, wants to keep the needle going, if that's the right way to
we love to hate russia? is it deserved? oscar pistorius's defense hammers a witness. she cries sayinging it was awful to hear the shots. what we know about the night of the killing. >>> the crisis in ukraine. vladimir putin will do next. joining me now is robert legvald and general mark kimmet and fareed zakaria. fareed, we spoke last night and had a fascinating debate about the state of play. i want to play you a clip. this is president clinton talking to me at the cgi last september about his own dealings with vladimir putin because it seems to me that trust in putin right now is absolutely key. listen to this. >> mr. putin has got -- he's very smart. >> you know him better than most people. >> yeah, i do. >> what was he like behind closed doors away from sort of the public utterances? >> smart and remarkably -- we had a really good, blunt relationship. >> how blunt? >> brutally blunt. >> did putin ever renege on a personal agreement made to you? >> no, he did not. >> behind closed doors he could be trusted. >> he kept his word in all the deals we made. >> i found that fascin
by russia's defense minister who said it has nothing to do with ukraine. it's russia's forces going through an u unannounced test, basically making sure that the army, the navy, and the air force can react to any perceived threats as quickly as they should be able to. now they did say that the black sea fleet, which is based in crimea in ukraine is being adequately protected, and the fleet is being bumped up a bit, which is probably what you would expect for any country with overseas military assets near a country going through a revolution at the moment. although they have said that the military drills have nothing to do with what is going on in ukraine, there are probably people who are very high up in the defense ministry and russian government as well who are thinking that reminding russia's neighbors and it's rivals of russian military might at a time when it's influence in central and eastern europe has taken a big dent recently is certainly no bad to do from a russian geopolitical perspective. >> getlet's go to tim friend who has the latest from kiev. we understand that it's a novel
they are relenting. the troop buildup continues. the ukrainian coastal defense division is still pinned in. on the east coast of crimea, another military base is now encircled. and now border guards report seeing a massive buildup of military hardware on the russian side of the border. crimea is lost. kiev knows it. but how far did president putin's ambitions stretched. with one mighty turn to eastern ukraine. and is there anything to stop him? christian frazier, bbc news, sevastopol. >> big questions certainly. now to kiev. david stern is there for us. david, the prime minister of ukraine and the british foreign secretary have been speaking. what is their take at the moment? >> reporter: well, yes. as the crisis continues in crimea, the tension and worry and anger, among the ukrainian officials, is rising here. as you say. mr. william hague and the prime minister have been meeting. they have held a news conference. mr. hague said there will be consequences and costs to the russian actions. he promised a strong diplomatic and economic reaction, a response. but he said there was no military
was called the western defense zone. so they were we moved -- removed, they were forced to leave, and they were put in camps surrounded by barbed wire, and they were not charged with anything in particular. west coast non-japanese-americans, the population in general, most poll constitutions, most newspapers strongly supported the removal of japanese-americans. it was a very popular policy locally. the civil rights organizations which were largely based back east didn't pay much attention to it. in all of the major jewish newspapers on the west coast, they were weeklies, and they had editorials talking about how the rights of all are to be protected, and we should fight prejudice in all of it forms and so on and so forth without ever saying the word "japanese" specifically, so it was almost as if they wanted to say something but were nervous about actually doing so. so there was, i call it a kind of awkward silence or an uncomfortable silence around this issue that i started to investigate more. >> this weekend booktv and american history tv look behind the history and literary l
says troops in crimea are not under direct moscow control. >> if these are the forces of self-defense that were created by the residents of crimea. we did not order them. they didn't get any orders from us. >> reporter: i'm tim willcox live in kiev on independence square. at the heart of this crisis in ukraine. >>> also in the program, a third of all women in europe have been physically or sexually abused. the most e tensive survey of its kind also reveals one in 20 women say they've been raped. >>> the smog that's choking china, the country's prime minister blames it on inefficient and blind development. >>> also in the program, aaron is here looking at more of those challenges facing beijing. >> it's all about steering the world's second largest economy in the right direction. leaders are talking a leaner, cleaner growth tackling everything from smoke to corruption. beijing is also throwing more money at its military making the chinese defense budget now the second biggest in the world. >>> good to have you with us here on gmt. midday in london, 7:00 a.m. in london, 1:00 p.m. in par
. -- we want to reiterate our concerns to abide by the provisions of the 1994 defense memorandum. we guarantee the sovereignty and integrity of ukraine. we note that the provision calls for the one. -- call for the signatories to consult when there are questions concerning the commitments within the document. this clause is even more relevant now, and indeed represents an opportunity to peacefully resolve the current crisis. we are encouraged by indications that government of ukraine is taking steps to ensure political inclusiveness in the governance of the country. we believe this is a prudent way of addressing one of the underlying causes of the disputes and an early return to peace and stability. the call by the secretary general for cool heads to prevail remains relevant under the circumstance. we urge all concerned to refrain from provocative action that will precipitate now and in the future and unnecessary human suffering. i thank you. >> i thank the representative of nigeria for the statement. i look forward to the representative of the republic of korea. >> thank you, madam
violence. >> translator: if you are talking about self defense of the cry crimean people, we haven't given them orders. there were special measures taking to the hinderland. as our president said, we will do everything we can to present any blood shed. >> as we mentioned, the world's top diplomats are meeting in paris. it was scheduled to discuss syria but u ukraine discussion is to be high. our diplomatic editor looks at how one crisis is affecting the other. >> the ongoing battles in syria are more than a thousand kilometers away from ukraine. the crisis in crimea may have a real impact. the international community has given this man the job of trying to find peace in syria, but talks convened by veteran peacemaker have achieved nothing. getting both sides back around the table and persuading them, and in particular, the syrian government, to negotiate properly requires pressure from the u.s. and russia working together. that the doesn't look like it will happen. just like the peace talks, the deal to remove syria's chemical weapons was done by us secretary of state, john kerry a
obviously that putin has used the same defense, that he's trying to protect russian-speaking minorities that hitler used in trying to protect german speakers, but, you know, beyond that it's really inappropriate. >> let me ask you, david. you spoke yesterday with the former defense secretary, robert gates. i wanted to bring this up. first i wanted to play something peter king said about red lines and criticizing the president. it goes directly to the conversation you had with robert gates. >> if he is going to have this policy, which i think to some extent is too -- is not strong enough, but if he is going to have that policy then he shouldn't be laying out scenarios and laying out red linings. he has to be consistent. >> that was obviously criticizing the president. john mccain using the words if he canless -- feckless, john mccain even more. he urged gop senators to tone down their criticism and try to be supportive of the president rather than madder at the president, that this is a time when you need to do that. what do you -- what do you think is going to happen here? >> well, i ca
need to keep our defenses up. in an unstable world we do need to keep up our defenses, that is right. that is why this country is investing in some very sophisticated military projects for the future. as twotain the spending percent of our gdp on defense. i do feel that many nato countries have or do stood up theirending -- reduced defense spending. we are one of the few countries that maintains the two percent spending on gdp. eightare countries across -- across nativity to reevaluate the defense spending. >> a partnership between ukraine and nato assigned. declaration did complement the charter that was signed. if you -- if possible nato involvement is ruled out, then are the signatures worth the paper they are written on? -ukraine commission has met on the back of those agreements. there will be further nato agreements -- meetings. we are clear in this house. that we are not planning another crimea war. i am not sure what the member is advocating that nato should do, in addition to the diplomatic moves we have made through nato. those agreements with ukraine are important but they
the ports. and today, they took over two strategic defense areas, defense missile systems. it appears now they control just about everything. well, overnight, united states time, my crew and i flew down to crimea to get a look on the ground and we'll begin where we landed. we arrived at the airport midday. and everything seemed pretty normal. nobody bothering you, nobody asking questions, nobody staring you down in any strange way. the weather much better here than in the north. and then, over here at this gate that leads out of the airport, a man who professes to be a local from simferopol who is volunteering, with volunteer equipment, things that belong to himself, but one difference you might notice here, see the brand-new scotch tape on the fence post here holding up what is a brand-new russian flag. the changes are subtle. they are not in any way oppressive. but they're here. >> i saw the victims for the first time in my life and i was scared. >> she grew up here. last week when the russians arrived, she was frightened. >> i thought that it was the beginning of maybe war and an expec
peninsula are not actually russians at all but instead members of local self-defense groups. that came as a surprise to many people with eyes and/or ears because they sure look like russian troops firing warning shots at hundreds of ukrainian soldiers attempting to reenter an air base on crimea that the russians have seized. so far this is the only known instance of shots fired between the two groups, but there are forces such as these in the streets of crimea's regional capital patrolling with no identification. today the administration said that the u.s. cannot yet prove that these forces are russian. >> it's pretty clear that they're russian troops. >> i think it's clear, but general dempsey, what evidence do we have. we don't have any evidence as yet. i think evidence could likely become available over time. >> just as an fyi, several of those troops have told reporters that they are russian. meanwhile, nato is cutting back its ties with russia, suspending its first joint mission to escort a u.s. ship as part of efforts to disarm syria. nato says forget about any more meetings with
of the ukraine. >> we know that the ukrainian defense minister, we just reported a little while ago, he says that the ukrainian military now is on the, quote, highest state of military readiness. is it really realistic that there could be military confrontation between ukrainian forces and invading russian forces? >> reporter: i don't think either side wants that and i think what the president and his advisors are trying to think about is two things, how do you drive up the cost to putin and how do you limit putin to go no further than he has already gone in crimea. give him some good advice, which would be restraint, don't take on the russian military unless they think twice about it. but also give them substantial economic support, stand by them, get the imf in there to give them short-term economic stability and there ought to be some kind of dramatic signal by the major foreign ministers of europe, and shicning an international spotlight on putin. the critontribut we need to cha there's a lot the administration can do to orchestrate at least an attempt to limit putin and drive up the cos
in over the black sea overnight according to the ukraine's defense ministry. john kerry is going to be in ukraine tomorrow. >> what about nato? >> nato ministers were meeting for two days and it was clear there were no military plans for the ukraine and russia's actions there. the north atlantic council, the political arm of nature -- nato -- met yesterday, but after speaking to the russian president, they were told the russian leader is quote not in touch with reality. there are about 6,000 troops inside ukraine. they defended the action at the opening of the human rights meeting in geneva. >> this is a question of defending our citizens and ensuring human rights >> he is trying to calm things and letting them know they have no plans of threatening them. >> how did we get here? things unravelled on february 20th when dozens of protesters were killed in kiev marking the bloodiest day in since the cold war. the president was kicked out and then he was granted asylum in ush russia and day later russian troops come in. and then russia is granted permission to deploy and they put of
media quoting ukrainian defense saying this happened, but you have the russian defense ministry saying this didn't happen. can you clear this up for us? >> we have conflicting reports and russian media reporting this deadline was set at 5:00 local time tomorrow to surrender or face a storm of russian military force in response. we have spoken to defense officials who say yes, there was an ultimatum. the commander thwarted one of the vessels that blocked in the harbor there. and we are told that the forces have three choices. they can swear allegiance and surrender or face an attack. now a denial through russian state media from the black sea fleet. the russian black city fleet that there was any such ultimatum. we are being told that these ultimatums have been regular and constant since russian troops first showed up. at various military bases and installations across that region. russian forces have been saying we have a limited time. they have not been enforced. we have russian lawmakers dealing with a necations of territory. tell us about that. >> so a group of members of the russia
for their strong support for israel. [applause] for our security, including in the vital area of missile defense. i said that the greatest threat to our common security is that of a nuclear-armed iran. we must prevent iran from having the capability to produce nuclear weapons. and i want to reiterate that point, not just, to prevent them from having the weapon, but to prevent them from having the capacity to make the weapon. [applause] that means we must dismantle iran's heavy water reactor and its underground enrichment facilities. we must get rid of iran's centrifuges and its stockpiles of enriched-uranium and we must that iran fully divulge the military dimensions of its nuclear program. now 17 countries around the world have peaceful nuclear energy programs. they're doing this without spinning centrifuges, without enriching uranium, without operating heavy water facilities, and without conducting military nuclear research. you know why iran insists on doing all of these things that the other peaceful countries don't do? it's because iran doesn't want a peaceful nuclear program. iran wants a mil
plan came in mid-january when the defense minister called kerry messianic. he was strongly condemned to the comments, but his words convey the difficulty ahead. >> doug, thank you. >>> thousands of anti-government activists marched peacefully to venezuela's capital today, trying to maintain that movement's momentum. afterwards, several hundred protesters erected barricades, burned tires and threw rocks and fireworks at national guard troops. they responded with tear gas. it's become a near nightly ritual for about two weeks. two people were e runner oscar pistorius' murder trial is under way in south africa. the olympian pleaded not guilty to murdering his girlfriend. he said he shot reeva steenkamp by mistake last valentine's day, thinking she was an intruder. a witness testified in court today she heard gunshots and blood curdling screams. prosecutors believe the world famous athlete shot his girlfriend after a fight and tried to paint a picture at the trial of a loud argument before the fatal shots. >>> one member of congress gets a fashion makeover. wait until you see why. >>> if
playing defense, doing it at an event in d.c. at an elementary school. trying to talk about education and domestic priorities. he took a question on ukraine. he wanted to weigh in on this. he heard this criticism he's been weak on the world stage. the president in conjunction with secretary of state john kerry who at the moment was in kiev pushing back hard against russian president vladimir putin. trying to send a unified message that it's not the administration that looks bad, it's putin that looks bad. kerry saying at one point putin vaded another country. the president also trying to put pressure. listen. >> strong belief russia's action is violating international law. president putin seems to have a different set of lawyers making a different set of interceptions but i don't think that's fooling anybody. >> the president and secretary of state talking about an aid package of a billion dollars to help out ukraine and deal with it from an economic standpoint. heavy pressure under secretary of state for russia to pushing back further than we've seen so far. >> the president's critic
clinic. secretary of the defense chuck hagel defended the proposal budget presented on the hill bringing military spending down by $400 billion. by 2015. but hagel said the cuts will not effect the military's ability to protect the united states. >> meeting our national security needs under constrained budgets. we focus on the balance. the balance that will be required to bend this country going forward. after more than a decade of long large stability operations we exchange the capacity to modern indication capabilities as we shift to focus on future requirements. these are shaped by enduring and emerging threats. >> well, ground forces will see the most cuts but the new budget protects investments into new technologies, vehicles. one of those projects is the joint striker fighter. but the program is way over budget so the military's plans are being scaled back. >> reporter: the joint strike fighter better known as the f 35 is supposed to be all things to all branches of the u.s. military. able to evade military radar, capable of super sonic speed and being able to land and take off lik
. they are going around with the self defense unit, and then you have throughout the day groups of people who are protesting, waving the russian flag, and they will protect russian interests wherever they are in the world. parallel to that you have the politics going on. the regional prime minister started the day saying they have taken temporary control of the military, the navy and police and also called on those commanders who did not want to follow his order to just leave their positions, and then he said that he announced that the referendum that was initially set for may 25th which was the same day as the national presidential election is now brought forward to march 30th. now in that referendum he will ask the people of crimea whether they want more autonomy from kiev. one might wonder what more they want. what they do want they do have autonomy in the budget, how to spend it. they have autonomy in matters of education, health, agriculture. but what seems to be happening at the moment that he's going to be asking whether they want to take orders from kiev any more, he'll ask people if
brennan, thank you. defense secretary chuck hagel also spoke by phone with his russian counter-part today. while the pentagon had no immediate details on the conversation, hagel cautioned russia in an interview recorded yesterday with bob schieffer for "face the nation." >> reporter: this in your view would be a mistake for the russians if they decided to go into the ukraine. >> ting would be a mistake. and this would set in motion so many different dynamics that are not in anyone's interests. >> axelrod: please note that secretary of state john kerry will also be speaking with bob schieffer tomorrow morning on "face the nation." chinese state media is reporting 28 people were killed and 113 injured in what's being called an orchestrated knife attack in the southwestern part of the country. this took place in kun-ming when a group of men reportedly wearing all black stormed a busy train station and began stabbing people with long knives. the attackers were shot and killed by police. now to southern california, where the headline is be careful what you wish for. after months of drought, th
that that is the prime minister, the acting president, the defense minister, that ukrainian troops are now in full combat readiness. they are desperate to seek a political solution but they said that any further intervention by moscow in crimea, about 800-kilometers south of the capital here in kiev, risked eventual war. the prime minister, the ukrainian prime minister spoke to his opposite number in moscow and he said that he had been told that there was no decision to bring troops in to ukraine just the possibility of military action on ukrainian territory. that's the way the ukrainians are interpreting, not reassuring one would think to the leadership here in key every. as you say, they are relatively inexperienced, but i think what they are hoping most is that a diplomatic political solution can be found because we saw on saturday some violent scenes in town on his the east of ukraine where, of course, there is also pro moscow sympathy. and they attacked pro european demonstrators, dragged them from the building they had been occupying and perhaps one of kiev's worst fears is that the mood, the pro m
, the defense chief. >> because of our correct tactics and our people refusal to surrender. ththe blitz by putin has failed. >> another shrine to those gunned down on the alleged orders of former president viktor yanukovych. tim friend, al jazeera, kiev. >> the unfolding events in ukraine and russia are been playing out on tv screens across the globe. but according to many media analysts some of the reports in russia are anti-ukraine propaganda. >> reporter: the world according to the kremlin played out each night on news broadcasts with a familiar loop on the sound track. the leadership of ukraine's interim government is made up of you will from a national fascists, near nazis and radicals from the west near bent on corruption. >> what the public sees is the picture in which fascist gangs seized tower in kiev. they are dangerous. they are jeopardized the livelihood of hours, russian speakers, russian.co. compatriots, you however it is put, and russia is coming to save these people. >> reporter: in my opinion the blood spilt in kiev are on the hands of western politician who is are coming to mee
failed with this policy that led us to where we are. i would renew the missile defense program in the czech republic and poland and probably have some nato exercises with particularly the bal baltic sta. obviously expand the magniski bill to target individuals that have to do with this, and the initial signals out of europe, the british and germans aren't encouraging sanctions. >> charlie: i do know that. do you think sanctions that were effective in iran would have the same kind of effect on vladimir putin? >> i think, first, i would try the magniski which targets individuals and their bank accounts and their ability to travel and all that. i would try that first. then, obviously, i would look at other areas. you know, throw them out of the g-8, of course. it should be the g-7. a number of other cosmetic kind of don't send our officials to the paralympics. but we have to understand what this guy is all about. he's an ogd kgb. in 2008, the debate i had with barack obama, i said at that time, watch russia and ukraine and, unfortunately, these many years later, i was correct. >>
in crimea because they weren't russian soldiers and insisted they were some sort of self-defense force who couldn't be ordered around by moscow. so a key thing. what we did see today from europe with this $15 billion aid program promised, linked, of course, to an imf deal, that again, priority being to try and bail out the ukrainian economy, to put it back on an even footing. the priority for the western powers. because at the moment in the words of the finance ministry here, the coffers are empty. there's no money in the ukrainian treasury. it's about stabilizing ukraine and about at this point, keeping them calm while the western powers work on calming down the russians, if you like, chris. >> you know, i go back to 1961 in august, when khrushchev put up the wall in berlin separating east and west berlin. kennedy saw it with relief. he said better a wall than a war because it was better the soviets did that on behalf of their clients in east berlin and east germany than to go to war and close down west berlin all together. in this case, i'm trying to see what a reasonable decision by put
and hezbollah's efforts to destabilize the region. state and defense department officials testified at the hearing which also covered the refugee crisis caused by the one million syrian refugees who now live in lebanon. this is just under two hours. >> i want to call this meeting of the senate foreign relations committee, the subcommittee on the near east, and central asian affairs to order. i want to welcome all who are here, especially our four expert witnesses who we'll hear testimony from today. the senate is currently in the middle of a vote on a veterans' bill that will take a bit of time, but i want to take advantage of folks being here. we will proceed to a first panel and then a second panel with questions, and this is a very important topic. the topic of the hearing today is lebanon at the crossroads. i just returned from a trip in lebanon last week with senator angus king of maine. we went together because we served together on -- serve together on armed services and budget committees, but i'm on the foreign relations committee, and senator king's on the intelligence comm
our defense and cutting the army to the smallest we have had since world war ii. with uic americans who want our country to be engaged in events beyond our borders. i see americans who want an internationalist foreign policy. i see americans who want our country to stand with israel and our other partners. i see americans who are willing to spend their hard-earned tax dollars on effective foreign assistance and to strengthen the greatest military the world has ever known. i see here today americans who want america to lead. i have been around a long time. since the coolidge administration. you i have never seen this world in need of strong american readership than it is today. of these the events negotiations with iran which i hope to succeed but i doubt, when i see the slaughter in syria, when i see the chinese inserting themselves in asia, when i see significant cuts in foreign aid and also in our defense budget, i'm worried. my final word to you my dear and beloved friends, america -- israel needs you more today than ever before. thank you and god bless. [applause] >> senator jo
by reconsidering and now building the missile shield president obama has hit. don't cut the defense budget. we have the secretary of defense cutting while the russians history of defense is negotiating leases all around the world. primarily go after the keystone pipeline. take the price of oil because of the world market with oil, the price of oil will go down. the price of oil goes down below $89 per barrel, the russians are broke again. they need oil above $100 per barrel. the heavy political leverage coming from supplying the majority of other parts of europe. it translates into electricity. build terminals so that american natural gas can go there. he has played the long game and is doing it very well. stop thinking we're going to do this today or tomorrow. to this the idea five, seven years from now we are in a better position. jenna: thank you. jon: with midterm elections inching closer, new poll shows thethe holy key edge with ameris on matters they deal about most. new "washington post" post "abc news" poll shows 48% said democrats are more in touch with them on big issues compared with onl
are? >> reporter: well, i think i talked to a former defense minister and others today and people would find it laughable if it weren't so deadly serious that russian forces have not already intervened in crimea. obviously there is huge concern about russian forces extending into eastern ukraine, which we have not seen, thankfully. but there's nobody here that you talk to in kiev who believes that the forces were seeing on the ground in crimea, as our own people have been reporting and others have been reporting, are not russian forces. the idea that there are self-defense militias simply -- it defies credibility. >> and you know, the other part of the news conference, anderson, president putin described the overall situation in ukraine as an unconstitutional coo. do ukrainians that you've been talking to see this escalating in the next few days? >> reporter: you know, there's certainly a lot of concern about that and i think they are watching it very, very closely. i think it's certainly the fact that vladimir putin has not sent forces into eastern ukraine they would see as a pos
between russia and the united states over things like syria, edward snowden and missile defense got a lot worse now over ukraine. craig? >> those winter olympics seem like they happened so, so long ago now. nbc's jim maceda for us in moscow, jim, thank you. let's turn now to nbc's chief global correspondent, bill neely, who's in crimea. >> reporter: the crisis here in crimea is deepening. but so, too, worries of an imminent russian takeover. we have seen russian boots on the ground here today, well-armed, well-disciplined men ringing key sites. they're at the interior ministry with rocket-propelled grenades. they're ringing crimea's parliament, machine guns on the ground in a show of force and they're also at crimea's main military airport. there overnight, up to a dozen russian aleutian transport planes brought in, including russian attack helicopters. ukraine's defense minister says around 6,000 additional russian troops have arrived. no confirmation of that. he calls it an invasion, whether you agree with that word or not, it certainly is an intervention. and the new ukrainian -- untes
of secretary of defense for policy. he helps execute defense policy, strategy for ity 15 middle east nations. we are happy to have him with us. i would like to ask mr. silverman first to offer your testimony. accept your written testimony into the testimony. try to summarize within five then we will get if question and answer after plehn.l >> thank you for inviting me to testify on the situation in policy toward that very important country and volatile region. the hearing comes at an important moment. public discussion of lebanon as say in the united states is often focused primarily on the refugee the syrian flows into that country. that crisis that you witnessed recent d during your visit to lebanon represents an urgent imperative need. lebanon faces broader issues. the united states is helping lebanon respond to the lebanon's because future affects important u.s. nterests in the region which are obvious by the geographical nature of the location and neighborhood. the syrian conflict threatens lebanon to establi establishes lasting stability. formation of a government by the prime ministe
the crisis. defense secretary hagel takes heat up on capitol hill but says the u.s. is suspending military exercises with russia and will step up training with poland's military. we have full coverage beginning with our chief national security correspondent jim sciutto here tw latest. jim? >> i think you could say today we saul the full yin and yang of the u.s. policy response to the crisis in crimea. on the other side, secretary of defense chuck hagel demonstrating the u.s. commitment to its nato allies with the deployment of some aircraft and the cancellation-of nato contacts with russia. on the diplomatic side, we saw the opening of a diplomatic path to solving the crisis, the so-called off ramp u.s. officials have mentioned before, still undefined, kerry said, but a start. >> reporter: u.s. and russian diplomats face to face for the first time since the start of the crisis in crimea. secretary of state john kerry said they are now negotiating a diplomatic path to ending it. >> we are committed to working with russia. together with our friends and allies in an effort to provide a way fo
call that defense?! come on! [ female announcer ] watch live tv anywhere. the x1 entertainment operating system, only from xfinity. what is this place? where are we? this is where we bring together the fastest internet and the best in entertainment. we call it the x1 entertainment operating system. it looks like the future! we must have encountered a temporal vortex. further analytics are necessary. beam us up. ♪ that's my phone. hey. [ female announcer ] the x1 entertainment operating system, only from xfinity. tv and internet together like never before. >> a snapshot of stories making headlines. the feds filed a lawsuit against itt, one of the largetest for-profit colleges in the country alleging they pushed and pressured students into loans that many could not pay back. 64% of the loans it provided are expected to default. states. >> the state of missouri executed its fourth deck row inmate in as many months. michael taylor was given a legal injection and was pronounced dead shortly after midnight. his attorneys argued it would cause inhumane pain and suffering. suffered.
and civilian parts and also it belongs to the ukrainian defense ministry. the bbc's christian frazier has tried to get into the sevatopol international airport. >> reporter: you might be able to see behind me the control tower and what looks like a military base. you can see there are barriers stopping anyone from entering. a couple hundred yards on, a very professional looking unit. they are carrying high-powered assault rifles, kevlar hell mats. they have not been down the road to meet us or talk to us, so we don't know who they are. quite clearly we're not allowed to go beyond this point. let me show you what is in front of the barriers. this is really what you would call a civilian guard. we spoke to this man here. he is a ukrainian who speaks russian. the flags flying on the road signs are russian sympathizers. they don't want to talk to us at all. they don't like the presence of the western media here. what we are seeing is a patent on our journey. we came through a roadblock last night. quite a significant roadblock. they were stopping all cars coming to sevastopol. the parliament is sti
saying that russia should not invade the sovereign space of ukraine. we've heard defense secretary chuck hagel speaking for the united states in nato, saying this should be a time for caution and wise, diplomatic moves. but we have yet to hear, until now, from the president of the united states on this situation. president barack obama in the white house briefing room. >> over the last several days, the united states has been responding to events as they unfold in ukraine. throughout this crisis, we have been very clear about one fundamental principle, the ukrainian people deserve the opportunity to determine their own future. together with our european allies, we have urged an end to the violence and encouraged ukrainians to pursue a course in which they stabilize their country, forge a broadbased government, and move to elections this spring. i also spoke several days ago with president putin, and my administration has been in daily communication with russian officials. we've made clear that they can be part of an international communities effort to support the stability and success of
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 151 (some duplicates have been removed)